• Another Dismal Act in a Well‑Practiced Melodrama of Rinder’s Life

    Sheila MacDonald

    Every time I (unfortunately) worked with Mike Rinder, he acted as though he owned the place and as though he was the most learned of executives and as though he had a very senior post. He treated others as beneath him. I only found out later that for many of those years, his supposed “senior executive post” was in fact a glorified messenger-boy job. His whole attitude was a pretense.

    I dreaded working with him as he very cunningly would make you feel small and stupid even when you knew you were doing a good job with your work, and all this was done with an attitude of how right and clever and high-level he was.

    Here’s some background that gives an inkling into that attitude:

    Rinder, 55, was born in Australia. His parents became Scientologists in 1960 and were recognized as Founding Scientologists in the land Down Under in the late ‘60s. His mother, brother and sister remain active, engaged and committed Scientologists.

    In 1973, after attending high schools in Australia and England, Rinder worked for his now-deceased father in the wholesale grocery business. That same year, he joined the Church’s religious order, the Sea Organization, in Australia. Three years later, in 1976, he married 20-year-old Cathy Bernardini, another Sea Organization member.

    After severing all ties with his Church, Rinder abruptly and callously abandoned his wife of more than 30 years and their children, one of whom would subsequently wage an excruciating war against cancer.

    In 2007, after severing all ties with his Church, Rinder abruptly and callously abandoned his wife of more than 30 years and their children, one of whom would subsequently wage an excruciating war against cancer. As his wife Cathy Bernardini tells it in a sworn affidavit:

    “In April 2009, I went to see Mike in Denver, but he didn’t want to see me. I tried to get in communication so he could be informed of family matters such as [our son’s] illness, but he adamantly did not want to talk to me or see me, so I flew back to L.A.”

    At this point, one might reasonably ask: What kind of father would do such a thing? And how could he live with himself?

    For Rinder, however, it was just another dismal act in a well-practiced melodrama of his so‑called life.

    You can read the whole story here.